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A journey through South African history – and its present

29 Jan 2019 - 15:30

Students and Professor Baz Dreisinger from John Jay College pose with their guide on Robben Island, Cape Town.

Earlier this month, IAPO’s Global Short-term Academic Programme welcomed a group of six students and Professor Baz Dreisinger from John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. The students were in Cape Town for a short-term winter programme, which is run annually: ‘The culture of race, resistance and revolution in South Africa, then and now’.

The programme kicked off with orientation and a themed dinner at Gold Restaurant. This was followed by a warm welcome to Cape Town by the manager of the Global Short-term Academic Programme, Nicola Latchiah. The students also enjoyed a guided excursion to Langa and Gugulethu, two townships in Cape Town.

For the duration of their stay, the students engaged with incarcerated individuals inside two Cape Town prisons. They worked with local organisations, such as Ceasefire in the Cape Flats and Hope Prison Ministry, which rehabilitates prison inmates through faith. They also interacted with South African historic institutions around the city to better understand the political economy of crime in the country.

The Global Short-term Academic Programme enjoyed hosting this special group of young students and looks forward to another programme with John Jay College.

The culture of race, resistance and revolution in South Africa, then and now

This programme is organised by IAPO’s Global Short-term Academic Programme and led by Professor Baz Dreisinger, founding academic director of the Prison-to-College Pipeline programme at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

“South Africa cannot be understood without being experienced, and it cannot be studied merely in a classroom. This course is thus a journey, including visits to vital Cape Town landmarks and meetings with powerful people in the contemporary cultural and political spheres,” according to the programme description.

The course aims to provide students with a deeper understanding and appreciation of the key issues facing South Africa – then and now – as related to three areas that have shaped the nation: race, resistance and revolution.